August 2016 General Meeting

Hoo’s Here?  Owl program given by Stillman’s Nature Center.IMG_1117 IMG_1118

EASTERN SCREECH-OWL    Wingspan 21 inches; length 8.5 inches. This is the only small eastern owl with ear tufts. The surface of the upper wings is marked with white spots. This owl comes in different colors, ranging from red to gray.

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BROAD-WINGED HAWK    Wingspan 34 inches; length 15 inches. It is a short, stocky hawk with distinctive black-and-white tail bands. When seen from below, the wings are white trimmed with black-tipped primaries.

 

 

 

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LONG-EARED OWL     Wingspan 36-42 inches; length 13-16 inches. Slender medium-sized owl with yellow eyes and prominent ear tufts. Tawny-orange facial disk is marked with a black, broad vertical stripe through each eye. It is the slimmest North American owl.

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BARN OWL     Wingspan 44 inches; length 16 inches. A slender, long-legged, mid-size owl with no ear tufts. This buff-colored bird has a distinctive heart-shaped face trimmed in tan. When viewed from below, the barn owl looks mostly white and can appear ghostly. Habitat: Widespread

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 BARRED OWL     Wingspan 38-50 inches; length 16-24 inches. Large, dark-eyed, gray-brown owl with a barred chest and striped belly. Lacks “horns” or feather tufts on its head, unlike the somewhat larger great horned owl.

 

MGC assists Daisy Troop #1810 with their “Caring for Others” Badge

Rachel Weiskopf, Olivia Pelletier, Annabella Sindler, Evelyn Folliard, Addyson Rebman, Madeline Hartke

Rachel Weiskopf, Olivia Pelletier, Annabella Sindler, Evelyn Folliard, Addyson Rebman, Madeline Hartke

On March 3rd, several of our club members (who have floral design experience) met with one of our local Daisy Troops to assist them in arranging flowers to be donated to local nursing home residents.  This project helped the Troop members earn their “Caring for Others” badge.

Traudl Koeberlein assists Rachel adding the ribbon to her arrangement.

Traudl Koeberlein assists Rachel adding the ribbon to her arrangement.

 

The girls used small mason jars as their floral vase and filled them with brightly colored flowers that were simply purchased at a local grocery store.  A decorative ribbon was tied to the top of the jar to provide the finishing touch.

Terri LaDuke assists Bella in selecting her flowers.

Terri LaDuke assists Bella in selecting her flowers.

Pat Schafer helps Addyson trim her flowers to size.

Pat Schafer helps Addyson trim her flowers to size.

January’s Regular Meeting

During our first meeting of the new year, we started to establish our processes and goals for 2016 & reorganize many of our various committees.

Edyta's sprouts after 5 days.

Edyta’s sprouts after 5 days.

 

The highlight of the evening was a demonstration by our own member, Edyta Greczek, of a technique to grow our own bean sprouts in the “dark” by re-using a juice carton.  Add a 1/3 cup of Mung beans or soybeans and (after following instructions) five days later you have your own fresh sprouts for adding to your favorite recipes.  Edyta also shared with members a confetti chicken salad which include sprouts and mini-crepes that included sprouts as a healthy added ingredient.

September 2015 General Meeting

The Impacts of Coyotes and other Canines in McHenry County

Mary Kozub from the McHenry County Conservation District shared with club members the changing habits of coyotes and other wild canines found within McHenry County.  The attendees learn how these habits can impact how they manage their backyards.  Mary also discussed the Conservation District’s objectives which are to provide recreation experiences, educational opportunities, and to provide open spaces for the benefit of people as well as wildlife and native plants.

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sept mtng food meting food

Garden Quarter Program “Monsters in the Garden” 7-2015

garden qtr julyGarden Quarter Program featuring Monsters in the Garden.

A quick update on the Garden Quarter program this summer. So far we have done 3, building scarecrows, to protect their garden , butterflies (monarchs)
and milkweed and monsters for their garden. (Joyce’s awesome project.)
The kids
liked their monsters so much none ended in their garden. Thanks for your help
Edyta, Dorothy and Judy.